Jim Staley - Mumbo Jumbo (2009) [Free Jazz, Free Improvisation]; FLAC (tracks+.cue)

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Mike1985
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Jim Staley - Mumbo Jumbo (2009) [Free Jazz, Free Improvisation]; FLAC (tracks+.cue)

Unread postby Mike1985 » 07 Jul 2021, 03:50


Artist: Jim Staley
Album: Mumbo Jumbo
Genre: Free Jazz, Free Improvisation
Label: Einstein Records
Released: 2009
Quality: FLAC (tracks+.cue)
Tracklist:
    CD 1:
  1. Untitled (5:36)
  2. Untitled (2:43)
  3. Untitled (5:40)
  4. Untitled (8:10)
  5. Untitled (2:01)
  6. Untitled (4:41)
  7. Untitled (3:39)
  8. Untitled (3:52)
  9. Untitled (4:21)
  10. Untitled (4:18)

    CD 2:
  1. Untitled (4:23)
  2. Untitled (1:09)
  3. Untitled (3:37)
  4. Untitled (4:45)
  5. Untitled (2:08)
  6. Untitled (4:36)
  7. Untitled (4:34)
  8. Untitled (0:55)
  9. Untitled (6:03)
  10. Untitled (4:51)
  11. Untitled (5:51)
  12. Untitled (4:20)

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    Personnel:
  • Jim Staley - trombone
  • Wayne Horvitz (CD1#1-4) - piano, DX-7, RX-11 drum machine
  • Elliott Sharp (CD1#1-4) - double-neck guitar/bass, soprano saxophone
  • Shelley Hirsch - voice (CD1#5-10)
  • Samm Bennett (CD1#5-10) - drums, percussion, electronic percusion
  • Bill Frisell - guitar (CD2#1-8)
  • Ikue Mori (CD2#1-8) - drums, drum machine
  • Fred Frith (CD2#9-12) - electric guitar, acoustic guitar, vocals
  • John Zorn - alto saxophone (CD2#9-12)

Jim Staley is one of the best trombonists you've never heard. His playing combines the technique of George Lewis with the playfulness of Jack Teagarden to produce wonders on his instrument. This recording is a series of four trio groupings with elite members of New York's downtown crowd in the mid-'80s, and fairly represents some of the state-of-the-art performances at the time. Among Staley's partners are John Zorn (alto saxophone), Bill Frisell (guitar), Shelley Hirsch (vocals), and Elliott Sharp (double-neck guitar/bass and soprano saxophone). While the novelty of these unions has paled somewhat over time, the playing is first-rate, and the self-effacing, under-recorded Staley is featured throughout. Most of the pieces sound like snippets, without melody or linear development. Still, they are fascinating structures, both for the quality of improvisation and for capturing a slice of an important freestyle genre.
Review by Steve Loewy

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